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Feature
About Chinese Musical Instruments...
Historical Trends in Preferences
for Musical Instruments...

Feature Musician REN GUANG
  



Ritual Music In a North China Village: The Continuing Confucian and Buddhist Heritage

READ THE PREFACE NOW


 


CMSNA Chicago Concerts
CHINESE MUSIC FESTIVAL
Saturday November 6, 2004 - 7:30 pm

University of Chicago I-House
1414 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL
$12, $8 (Students)
Tel: 630-910-1551 FAX: 630-910-1561



 


Feature:
When Did the Recently
Orchestrated "Jasmine
Blossom" Qualify for the Rank
of Bells and Drums Music?


"Jasmine Blossom" is a popular Chinese love song. Today I have 29 renditions of "Jasmine Blossom" from Southern to Northern in region. They range from Zeng Jiaqing’s "Flowers Tune", in the style of Jiangnan (south of Yangzi River) pop music, and Liu Guanyue’s "Jasmine Blossom", which is a traditional folk song for bamboo flute solo and accompanied by the sheng (mouth organ) of Northern China. In term of musical phenomenon, "Jasmine Blossom" of the East is similar to "Flower and Youth" repertoire from the Northwest. There is a rendition of "What a Beautiful Jasmine Flower", which Puccini merrily copied from the earliest imports of a few Chinese LPs he had chanced upon, when composing "Turandot". But in 3,000 years, "Jasmine Blossom" never falls into the class of Bells and Drums Music, until Liu Wenjin has his chance to orchestrate "Jasmine Blossom".



CMSNA Concerts
BEIJING WOMEN ENSEMBLE
Friday March 15, 2002 - 7:30 pm

Preston Bradley Hall, Chicago Cultural Center,
78 E. Washington
Tel: 630-910-1551




Sneak Preview Of Popular Book:
CHINESE MUSIC IN THE 20TH CENTURY
By Dr. Sinyan Shen

READ THE PRELUDE


 


Remembering:
Southern School Master of the Flute
Zhao Song Ting  
(1924-2001)


In order to tell the story "The Lone Orchid in Spring" the flute master excelled in the past 30 years. "Three Five Seven" and "Scenes On the Wu River" became the best work for the bamboo flute. After some sixty years experience as a player of the dizi, Zhao Song-ting was generally recognized as representative of the southern school of technique and is responsible for the Zhejiang school style that blends the vigor of northern style with the gentler character of the southern. Innovations in technique include uninterrupted breathing and particular control of dynamics. He has invented new forms of instrument, such as the paidi, a group of flutes of different pitch bound together, and the L-shaped bass bamboo flute. He has developed the theory and method of frequency calculation of the transverse dizi and has composed and arranged music that enjoys wide popularity.




Feature Musician:
Ren Guang  
and "Fishermen's Song"


Ren Guang is the first composer of China to have made a film famous because of the film's title song. "Fishermen's Song" remains today one of the best loved and most memorable songs of the Chinese people. "Fishermen's Song" was composed one third of a century into the 20th Century. Another third of a century later, Shen Xing-yang (Shen Sin-yan) first recorded "Fishermen's Song" in the United States.



CHINA NATIONAL ORCHESTRA
80 MUSICIANS ON VERTICAL FIDDLES, REEDED WINDS,
GRAND LUTES, BRONZE BELL CHIME, GONG CHIME

VIEW THE CONCERT PROGRAM FROM AUGUST 2000





CHINA: A JOURNEY INTO ITS MUSICAL ART

READ THE PREFACE NOW


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